Here is a list of workshops from the 2017 conference

  • “Does size matter? When it comes to condoms, yes!” with Milla Impola
  • “BURNOUT: the science of joy, for sex educators and other troublemakers” with Emily Nagoski
  • “Teaching Consent Across the Age Spectrum” with Harbor Health, Inc.
  • “Consuming Porn: Sex Positive, Abuse Negative” with Start Strong, Boston Public Health Commission
  • “Teaching strategies for engaging sex ed classes” with Lisa Hoopis
  • “Moving Beyond Statistics: Holistically Supporting Youth of Color” with Lola Akintobi
  • “Connecting Neurodiversity with Gender and Sexual Diversity” with Kira Manser
  • “Trauma Informed Sexuality Education” with Nicole Fava
  • “Running a Parent Meeting” with Lily Kofke
  • “STI Education That Makes A Difference” with Noah Bogdonoff
  • “Sex Ed Question Box: Crafting and Skills” with Megara Bell
  • “Contraceptive Update” with ABCD
  • “Age of Consent and Mandatory Reporting: Unintended Consequences” with Brian Flaherty

“Does size matter? When it comes to condoms, yes!” with Milla Impola

This interactive presentation will explore common condom complaints, and strategies that sexuality educators can use to increase condom use by talking about the importance of condom fit. I mean sure, you could technically fit a condom over a watermelon, but did anyone ever ask the watermelon how it feels?

“BURNOUT: the science of joy, for sex educators and other troublemakers” with Emily Nagoski

Looming white supremacist cisheteropatriarchal fascism got you down? Feeling exhausted and overwhelmed, and yet like you’re still not doing enough? This workshop offers a toolkit of evidence-based strategies to prevent and treat burnout, along with new insight into the cultural dynamics that trap us in self-defeating exhaustion, and how to escape the trap.

“Teaching Consent Across the Age Spectrum” with Harbor Health, Inc.

A presentation and open discussion about developing and adapting consent programming for middle school, high school, and college aged youth. Participants will also spend time creating their own consent scenario for middle school youth.

“Consuming Porn: Sex Positive, Abuse Negative” with Start Strong, Boston Public Health Commission

Pornography is the number one sex educator for youth. Participants will learn the process, creation, and implementation of a pornography curriculum to high school youth. Our orientation is sex-positive, supportive of healthy and joyful sexuality, yet educational about potential harms of pornography without a religious message or affiliation.

“Teaching strategies for engaging sex ed classes” with Lisa Hoopis

Participants will sample a variety of teaching and learning strategies and explore which they are most comfortable with and most likely to implement to add diversity and variety to their teaching style. We will also discuss multiple learning styles and how to adapt activities to meet the needs of the audience.

“Moving Beyond Statistics: Holistically Supporting Youth of Color” with Lola Akintobi

STIs. HIV. Unintended pregnancy. Youth of color are disproportionately impacted by adverse sexual health outcomes. In order to correct this health inequity, there are several sexual health curricula that are intended for youth of color. Much of the work we do is currently focused on prevention. How can we incorporate asset building and cultural competency to support youth in a well-rounded way? This workshop will focus on strategies that youth workers and sexual health educators can incorporate into their work. Together, let’s explore ways to holistically support youth of color.

“Connecting Neurodiversity with Gender and Sexual Diversity” with Kira Manser

Both autism and gender diversity have become more visible in recent years. At the same time recent research has shown that there is a significantly higher incidence of gender diversity among people on the autism spectrum than in the general public. This session will explore this correlation by examining leading theories of both autism and gender development. These theories will be harnessed to support participants in offering inclusive sex education, affirming to both autistic and trans or non-binary identified individuals. The goal of the session will be to increase understanding of and ability to support people from across the autism and gender spectrums.

“Trauma Informed Sexuality Education: Supporting the Sexual health of all Youth” with Nicole Fava

Youth with trauma/maltreatment histories are often overlooked, as are their prospects for positive, growth-promoting sexual experiences and relationships. This presentation will address sexuality education’s lack of sensitivity to childhood trauma/maltreatment. We will discuss practical modifications to programs, and what trauma-informed sexuality education could look like, as a way of promoting future sexual wellness.

“Working with Parents: Supporting Parents as the Primary Sexuality Educators of their Children.” with Lily Kofke

Parents can initiate conversations about sexuality using many different themes – relationships, communication, respect, body-image as well as intimacy and sexual behavior – as a way to share values and factual information enabling youth to take charge of their lives and make healthier, safer and better-informed decisions related to sexuality.

“STI Education That Makes A Difference” with Noah Bogdonoff

Good STI education doesn’t just teach teens about STIs and condoms—it encourages them to fight stigma, to test early and often, to treat STIs effectively, and to keep their partners up-to-date about their status. It’s hard to do all of this in one or two class sessions, but it’s not impossible. In this workshop, we’ll learn how to use students’ own emotions and biases to cut to the heart of the STI discussion and bring them around to a more effective approach to prevention after just one class.

“Sex Ed Question Box: Crafting and Skills” with Megara Bell

Questions written on index cards and slipped into an anonymous question box are a staple of sex education. Brainstorm strategies for dealing with the awkward ones, finding the question behind the question, and for negotiating diverse values. At the same time you’ll be crafting your very own sexy, fun and colorful anonymous question box to take back to class with your newfound Q&A confidence.

“Age of Consent and Mandated Reporting: Unintended Consequences” with Brian Flaherty

The law tells young people when they can consent to have sex, and decides what kind of sexual expression are harmful to create or consume. These laws have unintended consequences for youth, for sex educators, and for anyone doing any kind of reproductive health work with youth. In this workshop we will talk about these laws and their consequences, age of consent, mandatory reporting, and possible ways to advocate for change.